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CBS 2 - Search Results

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Some Fruits Help Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

CEDAR RAPIDS (CBS 2/FOX 28)--We've all know that fruits are good for our health but now, a new study shows that eating certain fruits could help protect against type 2 diabetes.
   
Fruits and veggies, they're often the first thing you see when you walk into the grocery store.

Maybe they should start being the first thing you buy as well.

"I think we've known about the benefits of eating whole fruits for quite some time so it's nice to have a study that validates that, said Hy-Vee Registered dietitian, Linda Ashley.

That study shows that eating particular fruits can significantly lower your risk of type 2 diabetes by more than 20 percent.

Every time you add an additional three servings a week you lower the chance of developing diabetes by two percent.

"Blueberries, apples, grapes seem to have a more beneficial effect as the consumption of others fruits, said Dr. Shubhada Jagasia of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Scientists say the darker colored ones are rich in fiber and antioxidants which help in regulating blood sugar, but we're only talking whole fruitsnot juice.

"When you're drinking your calories from fruits you can get a lot of sugar really quick, said Ashley.

In fact researchers found that opting for juice increases your chance of getting diabetes.

Linda says part of the health factor is that it takes a lot longer to eat an apple than it does to eat a bag of chips.

Eat slower, feel fuller faster, and you eat less.

The study was funded by research grants from the national institutes of health.
 
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