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With no more deadline, local DACA recipient uncertain, but hopeful reform will come

If a DACA bill is not passed before the federal injunction ends, a dreamers' DACA status could change, which would leave them to worry if they'll be deported after their current status expires.

More than 800,000 immigrants who came to the United States illegally as children hoped to finally know their fate with the DACA program on Monday.

March 5th was originally the last day DACA recipients could apply to renew their status, but two district court rulings changed that, for now.

CBS 2 news spoke with a dreamer in the corridor who is worried about what could happen next.

She asked CBS 2 not to identify her face or name, so she will be referred to as "Maria." Although she speaks English and Spanish, she felt more comfortable answering some of the questions in Spanish, so they've been translated into English.

"I can't see past that, I don't know what will happen, I don't know what I'll have to do," said 24-year old Maria in Spanish.

So far there is no DACA bill in sight, and now a federal injunction is extending the DACA renewal process for some.

"A lot of people are going to kinda be in limbo, " said Immigration Attorney Dan Vondra, "because of the federal litigation about the way the DACA program was ended, immigration has continued to accept DACA renewals."

Vondra, an immigration attorney in Iowa City, said if a DACA bill is not passed before the federal injunction ends, a dreamers' DACA status could change, which would leave them to worry if they'll be deported after their current status expires.

"Once that ends, they still have to make a prosecutorial decision whether they're going to begin removal proceedings against somebody or not," said Vondra. "If they don't...they're left in limbo. If they do, then the person has to contest their case with the immigration judge and find out if there is any way they'll be able to remain in the country."

Maria, like other DACA recipients, came to the United States at a young age. She was only 10.

"The decision wasn't mine, my parents made the decision to bring me here," said Maria.

Her father constantly traveled in the U.S. and the family wanted to be together once and for all.

"And I don't have any regrets," she said.

Maria is now thriving with a college degree and a good job in the corridor, but still faces a lot of uncertainty day-by-day.

"It's fear that I have everything I have now and then it gets taken from my hands," she said.

"Now that DACA doesn't have a hard and fast deadline, I think yeah it's easy to get distracted and move on to the [next] story," said Vondra.

Hoping for the best, but Maria is also preparing for the worst, including being forced to leave the U.S. one day.

"I'm anxious, and emotional because, even though something bad could happen, something good could happen too," she said.

The Trump Administration did ask the supreme court to review the two federal judge rulings blocking the end of the DACA program. This week, the high court declined to do so.

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