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Public health experts explain what type of flu shot you should get

America is bracing for what could be a bad flu season after Australia just endured one of its worst flu seasons ever. That could be an indicator of what is coming for the U.S. That means it's time to get serious about a flu shot according to health experts.

America is bracing for flu season after Australia just endured one of its worst flu seasons ever. That could be an indicator of what is coming for the U.S. That means it's time to get serious about a flu shot according to health experts.

There are more than one type of flu vaccinations you can get. The quadrivalent flu vaccine is designed to protect against four different flu viruses; two influenza A viruses and two influenza B viruses. The trivalent shot protects against two influenza A viruses and one B virus.

For Seniors, a more robust vaccine is recommended. "We know people who are over the age of 65 have a higher incidence of influenza with complications," says Senior Public Health Nurse in Linn County, Heather Meador. There is a quadrialent flu vaccine for seniors that offers more protection from all strands of the virus.

While there are different types of shots, experts say it's imperative to just get one vaccination every year, no matter which one is available to you. "Getting something is better than nothing," says Meador, "so whatever you can find, that's what you want to get."

Many worry they could actually contract the flu after getting the vaccine. The flu shot can cause mild side effects that are sometimes mistaken for flu. For example, people sometimes experience a sore arm where the shot was given. The needle stick may also cause some soreness at the injection site. Rarely, people who get the flu shot have fever, muscle pain, and feelings of discomfort or weakness. If experienced at all, these effects usually last 1-2 days after vaccination and are much less severe than actual flu illness.

While Meador admits the vaccination is never 100% effective, but it will make symptoms less sever if you still get the flu, and it won't last as long.

According to the CDC, everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every season.

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