MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

National Stop the Bleed Day encourages Iowans to build confidence, skills in saving lives

Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of death after injury, but Dr. Skeete said it can sometimes be prevented when professional help is still minutes away.

On Saturday's National Stop the Bleed Day, a service initiative first started by the Committee for Trauma, people from around the world and in the corridor learned the skills it takes to be able to stop uncontrolled bleeding before paramedics arrive and prevent additional deaths in any horrific trauma event.

Connie Gowan is one of many Iowans who learned how to do this at one of four classes offered on Saturday at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

"I'm a nurse, so it was a refresher for me because I haven't done trauma nursing in a long time," said Gowan.

It was also her way of preparing for mass attacks she said have become far too common in everyday life.

"People need to be proactive because I think everybody thinks it's not going to happen where they live, in their school, in their town, and people should know how to help," she said.

"We feel it's important for the public to be aware to recognize life-threatening bleeding an give them the techniques to stop bleeding until EMS arrives," said Dr. Dionne Skeete, UIHC Trauma Surgeon.

Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of death after injury, but Dr. Skeete said it can sometimes be prevented when professional help is still minutes away.

"Especially injuries to the extremities, the neck, that if pressure was just held for five minutes by the first person who encountered that victim that life could have been saved," she said.

Saturday's participant learned to stop the bleed in any trauma event by simply knowing their ABCs.

"The first is A, alert 911," said Dr. Skeete. "The second is B, bleeding. Assess what's bleeding, where's the bleeding coming from and if you can provide assistance."

Finally C, which is applying compression to the area.

"If someone is able to do something, have the skills to do something...that they do something because that can save a life," said Dr Skeete.

Once a person calls 911, if the wound is on an arm or leg and bleeding, a tourniquet can be used to stop the bleeding. If no tourniquet is available or nearby, a person can pack clean fabric or gauze and put pressure on the wound until the paramedics arrive.

"People try and just rely on first responders when first responders take time to get there," said resident DJ Reese.

Reese said he participated in National Stop the Bleed Day to prepare for a future boys scout trip in the wilderness where access to medical professionals in an emergency may be harder to find or access.

"The only way to get out of an emergency situation is by helicopter or plane," he said.

He said it is classes like this one that has prepared him and others to be confident and waste no time even in the most horrific emergency.

"f you've already learned to use the equipment, that's one piece that will come a little smoother, while there's chaos going around," said Gowan.

Anyone interested in finding a course on bleeding control training can do so by going on the bleeding control website. People can also apply to become future instructors for courses.

close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending