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Go Red For Women, fighting heart disease

Hundreds of women across the corridor are uniting in the name of heart health to raise money for research and education to fight the number one killer of women in America.

Hundreds of women across the corridor are uniting in the name of heart health to raise money for research and education to fight the number one killer of women in America.

Roughly one in every four women will die from heart disease, which is mostly preventable.

Survivor Colleen Shaull says heart disease nearly killed her.

She noticed one of the warning signs one day while climbing a set of stair and suddenly running out of breath. She told her doctor, and that conversation saved her life. "I didn't suffer a heart attack, but I have stents...If you’re slowing down for any reason whatsoever, tell your doctor. That’s what they’re there for."

Shaull's family has a long history of heart disease. Her grandmother suffered a debilitating stroke, and then her mother lost her life from a heart attack.

"A fifteen-year-old... My cousin's daughter got done cheerleading practice walked across the gymnasium floor massive heart attack and died at fifteen, so anything is possible."

Shaull's story is one of many, inspiring more than 400 people to mobilize in Coralville with the common goal of saving lives.

Through a silent auction and donation, the Go Red for Women luncheon on Thursday aimed to raise nearly $100,000 for research and education, to teach women the warning signs of chest tightness or trouble breathing.

"Your health, whether it's your heart or anything, is not worth putting on the back burner," advises Shall.

UltimatelyGo Red for Women hopes to put an end to heart disease, by bringing more awareness to the issue. "Twenty, forty, fifty years from now it won’t exist anymore... that’s my goal."

Over the past ten years, donations to the foundation helped save hundreds of thousands of lives.

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